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Symptom, Causes and Diagnosis of Osteoporosis

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Osteoprosis symptom causes diagnosis | Avant Orthopaedics

What are the Symptoms of Osteoporosis?

Fractured or collapsed vertebrae can cause chronic back pain, which may be severe and disabling, adding to the challenges faced by those with brittle bones

As the vertebrae in the spine weaken and collapse, individuals may experience a gradual loss of height and a stooped posture, a condition that is also known as kyphosis. This is a characteristic of brittle bones.

Osteoporotic fractures most commonly occur in the hip, spine, and wrist. These fractures can result from minor falls or even routine activities, further emphasizing the vulnerability of weak and brittle bones.

As the vertebrae in the spine weaken and collapse, individuals may experience a gradual loss of height and a stooped posture, a condition also known as kyphosis. This is a characteristic of brittle bones.

If you notice any of these signs, we recommend reaching out to our specialists at Avant Orthopaedics for proper diagnosis and treatment.

What are the Causes of Osteoporosis?

The most common cause of Osteoporosis is ageing, as our bone density begins to decrease from the approximate age of 30, and continues to do so as the years pass by. There are also a variety of other causes of this condition such as:

Menopause Osteoporosis Symptom

As the levels of oestrogen decrease, bone density will begin to lower too. Therefore, after menopause, the rate of bone loss accelerates, making this period particularly vulnerable. On average, women can lose up to 10% of their bone mass in the first five years after menopause. Beyond the immediate postmenopausal years, the rate of bone loss generally slows down, but the risk of osteoporosis remains.

Individuals who have previously experienced fractures, especially fragility fractures, which are fractures that occur from minor trauma or falls, are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis. These often indicate weak as well as brittle bones and an increased susceptibility to future fractures.

Long-term use of specific medications can lead to bone loss and increase the risk of osteoporosis. Notable examples include corticosteroids, which can negatively impact bone density and quality. Other medications, such as some anticonvulsants and certain cancer treatments, may also contribute to weak bones.

How is Osteoporosis Diagnosed?

Your healthcare provider will begin by asking about your medical history, including any previous fractures, family history of osteoporosis, and your lifestyle habits, including diet, exercise, smoking, and consumption of alcohol. You may also be asked whether you have any existing medical conditions or are on any medications as they could lead to an increased risk of fractures and lower bone mass.

A physical examination may be performed to assess your posture, height, and any signs of curvature in the spine, which can be indicative of vertebral fractures. Your healthcare provider may examine your gait along with muscle strength.

Also known as DEXA, DXA, or Bone Density Scans, it is used to diagnose osteoporosis by measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in specific areas of the body, typically the hip, spine, or forearm. A T-score or Z-score is calculated to compare your BMD to that of a healthy young adult, and the score indicates the risk of osteoporosis.

A T-score will be assigned if you are a postmenopausal woman or man aged 50 or older. It is calculated by comparing your bone mineral density (BMD) to that of a healthy young adult of the same sex. Here's what different T-scores mean:

It means your bone density is similar to that of a healthy young adult. This indicates that your bones are considered healthy and strong.

This suggests that you have osteopenia. Osteopenia is a condition where your bone density is lower than that of a healthy young adult but not severe enough to be classified as osteoporosis. It indicates that your bones are weaker than ideal but not at the level of osteoporosis.

A score of -2.5 or lower is indicative of osteoporosis. This means your bone density is significantly lower than that of a healthy young adult, and your bones are at a high risk of fractures.

Unlike the T-score, which compares your bone density to that of a healthy young adult, the Z-score compares your bone density to that of individuals in your peer group. Z-scores are typically used for premenopausal women, men younger than age 50, and children. Here are what different Z-scores mean:

If your Z-score is -2.0 or lower, it suggests that your bone mineral density is significantly lower than what is typical for people of your age, sex, and, in some cases, ethnicity. This low Z-score may indicate low bone density, but it doesn't necessarily mean you have osteoporosis. Instead, it might suggest other factors such as medications or underlying medical conditions that are affecting your bone health.

If you notice any of these signs, we recommend reaching out to our specialists at Avant Orthopaedics for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Are You or Your Loved Ones At Risk of Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a condition that can easily go undetected, and early detection can improve treatment outcomes. Whether you or your loved ones are facing this condition, feel free to book an appointment with us at Avant Orthopaedics, and we will provide you with a personalized consultation.

 

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